The extremely interesting essay by Elissavet Barbaliou, legible even by those least familiar with the science of psychology, comes to address a big gap in gender studies in our country as well as internationally. Vividly written and admirably succinct, it guides us, from the distant past to the intangible digital networking of our time, into the contradictory nature of the “submissive-rebellious Greek man”, as she puts it.

Using “live” cases, derived from her professional experience, of men who sought solutions in their personal and family deadlocks, and based on a rich international and Greek bibliography, the author achieves what other female writers in her field fail to do: not to write as a feminist but as anatomist of the still largely unexplored father-and-son relationship in our time.

V. Vassilikos

The nice and understandable writing of a person who has learned not only to listen to the pain and the difficulties involved in others’ relations, but also to address them in a meaningful way touching their inside, constitutes an invaluable gift of the author’s.  This makes the book accessible even to readers not familiar with the therapeutic concepts.

Moreover, the multilevel and multifocal synthetic approach may help in particular social workers and those involved in humanitarian sciences, health care and prevention specialists and therapists in general, irrespective of the approach they adopt.

D. Sakkas